Angry Spying Birds

Angry spying Birds

Angry Birds, one of the most used APPs in the smart phones all across the globe developed by Rovio are being used to spy upon by NSA and its British sibling GCHQ from the year 2007. Starting with the user’s basic information like age, gender, marital status and sexual orientation to the user’s social networking information.

According to the previously undisclosed documents leaked by CIA Whistleblower Edward Snoden, the British cyber spies at GCHQ in Cheltenham showcased a pilot project Codenamed ‘SQUEAKY DOLPHIN’ to NSA in which they could monitor social network apps including Facebook and Twitter and a host of videos and personal information in the user’s smart phone. It was claimed that both British and American Intelligence Agencies plotted to gather information not just from Angry Birds but also from a host of different smart phone Apps.

In a statement issued by the Briton’s GCHQ, the spokesperson emphasized that the agency operated within the Law and also refused to confirm or deny the existence of the project Squeaky Dolphin. The statement read: “All of GCHQ’s work is carried out in accordance with a strict legal and policy framework which ensure that our activities are authorized, necessary, and proportionate and that there is rigorous oversight, including from the Secretary of State, the Interception and Intelligence Services Commissioners and the Parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee. All of our operational processes rigorously support this position.”

The NSA spokesperson said that “the US agency does not profile every day Americans as it carries out its foreign intelligence missions.”

The agencies have long been intercepting earlier generations of cellphone traffic like text messages and metadata from nearly every segment of the mobile network — and, more recently, mobile traffic running on Internet pipelines. Because those same networks carry the rush of data from leaky apps, the agencies have a ready-made way to collect and store this new resource. The documents do not address how many users might be affected, whether they include Americans, or how often, with so much information collected automatically, analysts would see personal data.